Cultural Studies Colloquium: "A Deeper History of an Insurrection: When Past Meets Present on 1/6/21."

w/ Gerald Horne, Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston.

Thursday, March 4, 2021 4:30 PM to 7:00 PM
Zoom Virtual Event

Make sure to join us virtually at the Cultural Studies Colloquium for a talk by Gerald Horne, Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston, titled "A Deeper History of an Insurrection: When Past Meets Present on 1/6/21."

Below is a summary of his talk:

"Professor Horne's remarks will trawl his own published work in order to illuminate the hinge moment that was 1/6.


The class composition of the earliest settler colonial node by London in the 1580s in North America will be deployed to shed light on the class dynamics of 1/6; similarly, the class collaboration of that node will be tied to that of 1/6--just as the class struggle that has characterized the journey of Africans on these shores will be employed to explain their relative absence among the insurrectionists on 1/6. The half-millennium triptych--religion, race, class--will be the prism through which 1/6 is viewed. Thus, the decline of the class project has turbo-charged the rise of a kind of "White Christian Nationalism" that was on full display on 1/6. And, of course, the entente with China initiated a half-century ago--and routinely touted by various U.S. elites as a stroke of genius--will be used to illuminate how Beijing poised in the passing lane haunted the U.S. on 1/6, as it shall do for decades to come."

Gerald Horne is the Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston. His research has addressed issues of racism in a variety of relations involving labor, politics, civil rights, international relations, and war. He is the author of more than 30 books and 100 scholarly articles and reviews. His current research includes an examination of U.S.-Southern African relations since the so-called “Anglo-Boer War” at the end of the 19th century and an analysis of the political economy of the music called “Jazz” from the late 19th century to the present.  


Flyer Horne CSC Talk