Cultural Studies PhD Candidate Ayondela McDole engages in local restoration project

Cultural Studies PhD Candidate Ayondela McDole engages in local restoration project

As part of a group of George Mason University students and faculty, Cultural Studies PhD candidate Ayondela McDole helps preserve the history of a local historic hub at Salisbury, MD. The Charles H. Chipman Cultural Center houses materials dating back to the time when it formed part of a predominantly black entertainment and business district called Georgetown.

As the only surviving building from the era, the Chipman Center, McDole points out, "is powerful in tradition and powerful in history." Under the guidance of Dr. Charles Chavis, Director of African American Studies at George Mason University, the restoration project will clean and archive artifacts in order to keep alive the memory of a flourishing culture of community life. Their work begins a months-long restoration effort with the goal of setting up a community archive.

Students will cap the week off by engaging in interviews with the local population to collect an oral history of the lynching of a black man named Matthew Williams in 1931 Salisbury for a work of documentary.

For a detailed report on the project, follow this link.